Wednesday, September 12, 2012

Care tags - how to remove them

Your best friend to help remove care tags from your Hermès scarves and shawls is a thread scissor, with sharp, pointed tips and flat blades.
 
For the rest, please see the video (which also includes the removal of a dip dye tag, for dear CS)



The results:  
Fleurs d'Indiennes 90 Carré

Dip dye Brides de Gala
 
You can find scissors with sharp points at habberdasheries (british for sewing supply store )
Mine are by Kai (Kai 5100), but Pam mentioned in the comment section of the previous post that Wiss makes great ones too.

'Habberdashery' is one of my favorites british words, it carries a promise of treasures to be found.. I looked up it's meaning today, and so nice to find what a charming origin it has:

Habberdasher. [A term which meant originally "peddlers' wares," or the contents of a peddler's bag; derived from German "Habt ihr das", "Have you this?" - a phrase which peddlers formerly used when offering their wares for sale] A dealer in small wares; specifically a dealer in small articles of dress, as neckties, collars, ribbons, trimmings, thread, pins, needles, etc.; also a dealer in hats.

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32 comments:

  1. So far I've carefully removed the tags on most of my scarfs with very slim (nail) scissors. But after watching this effort full video still wanted to add: You're simply the best!! (just in case you didn't know ;-). xox, Macs

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    1. Whatever gets the tags safely removed is great, my dear Macs <3 Now, I can't get Tina Turner out of my head! xx

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    2. Ha, Ha - That was my one and only intention! :D Although, there are worse haunting melodies one could be stuck with. ... better than all the rest... LOL!

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    3. Very witty, my dear hair-mess, you had me laughing out loud! xox

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  2. Very helpful video, as always dear MT. I've only removed two care tags until now, both times using a seam ripper, and both times dreading an accident. Do you think it's safer/easier with a pair of scissors?

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    1. I tried a seam ripper today, and it worked fine. If the stitches are very tight, it seems a bit hard to get underneath them, as the tip is blunt and convex. I find this part easier with the scissors. But once the thread has been scooped up, I think it is virtually impossible for an accident to happen :-)

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  3. I love it Mai Tai! I am very careful removing my tags too but your video is so sweet. Love the German origins of the word Haberdashery and you describe all the items that make clothing so charming. In the USA, haberdashery is usually a tailor shop which specializes in men's clothing. Tant pis....I like your definition better!

    Emily from alovelyinconsequence.blogspot

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    1. Glad you enjoyed the post, dear emilyatheart! Thank you for sharing the US meaning of haberdashery :-)

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  4. You,my dear are amazing! Again you share your wisdom with us. This weekend I am going to search for the little pointy scissors and begin a snippin'! Tinkled pink over your ideas and tips! I hope you have a lovely autumn weekend ahead...T xx

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    1. Happy snippin', and a super happy weekend to you too, my dear friend! Autumn hugs to you xx

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  5. MaiTai, I use a Prym Nahttrenner as I grew up with one being in constant use. My mum used to make much of our clothing and I remember turning collars on my Dad's shirt when I was barely at school. Was very handy in my teenage years when jeans never came tight enough for my liking, LOL. Anyway, they are sold here as "stitch rippers", quite a hilarious name for such a simple tool. It comes with a cap so is a bit safer for me with my daughter around. Your scissors look fiendishly sharp and pointy!

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    1. Nahttrenner sounds so much gentler than stich rippers! So jealous of your sewing skills as a teenager. Back then, I tried the cold bath tub method, but without much success, LOL. The little scissors mean business indeed, but should definitely not to be used within a mile of young children around!

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  6. Dear MaiTai, Very helpful as always! I am hoping you will follow this up with a post about how you wash your Hermes scarves ... here's hoping! ;-)

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    1. A washing post is on the list, in fact it has been for some time! I will come, I promise :-)

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  7. Thanks for this very helpful video. Who are the composer & performer of the "background" music, and what is the title of the piece? Thanks much!

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    1. The track is called 'Piano Ballad' and it is part of Apple's iLife Sound Effects in iMovie. The Artist is credited as Apple Inc. Hope this helps :-)

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  8. Thank you, dear MaiTai for doing this post. The tag is on one of my dip dyes is so very close to the hem, but with your detailed instructions, thread scissors, a steady hand, and nerves of steel, I'm sure I'll be successful in removing the tags. A glass of wine will come later in celebration of completing the task and to calm my nerves. ;-)

    Orange hugs,
    CS

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    1. You've got all the right ingredients, my dear CS. Hope the removal was a success!

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  9. Thank you for the great little video, my dear Mai Tai!
    I have started removing my tags with the help of a seam ripper and a needle ( to loosen the stitches if they are very tight and before using the seam ripper). I do it from the back side of the tag so nothing bad happens.
    Love the word ' haberdashery'. Thank you for letting us know what it means :)
    Wishing you a most restful weekend ahead. Warm hug, Manuela xx

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    1. Glad you found a method that works, and happy you enjoyed the little video! xx

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  10. What a wonderful post! I think the German phrase for "Habberdasher" is much older than the one in the translation. It must be "Hat er das hier?" instead of "Habe ihr das?", but the meaning is the same.

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    1. Many thanks, dear Sanne. You might enjoy this article here as well.

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  11. My dearest MaiTai,
    Another amazing video! No one can show how to's as clearly and as artfully as you. I am a Kai fan too - the best for delicate operations. And love the word 'habberdashery' - so intriguing and magical.
    Wishing you a most wonderful weekend, dear MaiTai. Sending you much love and big golden hugs xxx

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    1. Sending kai fan hugs to you, my dearest Scarf Enthusiast! Hope you had a most wonderful (and special week) <3

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    2. Thanks to a dear sweetheart angel, my week could not have been more special <3 xx

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  12. Dear MaiTai, Thank you for the lesson on tag removal. I recently purchased my first carre, as planned (and hoped) on a trip to France. I was helped by a lovely SA at the Rue de Sevres store in Paris. However, when I opened my orange box back at the hotel, I was surprised that the reference (paper) tag was not included. Is this normal? I was a bit disappointed not to have it! Thanks, Sister

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    1. Many congratulations on your first carré, hope you'll have much fun and joy wearing it! I would not worry about the paper tag, in France they get almost always removed. Nearly all of the tag's information is written out on your invoice. You just have to add the color names, and your records will be complete.

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